Idioms & Phrases Starting from A -List of Important Idioms from Word A

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Idioms & Phrases Starting from A List of Important Idioms & Phrases starts from word A for Banking SSC Competitive Exams General Idioms & Phrases for various exams English Idioms Commonly Used In Daily Language

Idioms & Phrases Starting from A -List of Important Idioms from Word A

An idiom is a phrase where the words together have a meaning that is different from the dictionary definitions of the individual words, which can make them hard for ESL students and learners to understand. In this Article we provide you Important Idioms & Phrases starting from A. Check List below…

A bit much : If something is excessive or annoying, it is a bit much.

A fool and his money are soon parted :  This idiom means that people who aren’t careful with their money spend it quickly. ‘A fool and his money are easily parted’ is an alternative form of the idiom.

A OK : If things are A OK, they are absolutely fine.

A poor man’s something ; Something or someone that can be compared to something or someone else, but is not as good is a poor man’s version; a writer who uses lots of puns but isn’t very funny would be a poor man’s Oscar Wilde.

A1 : If something is A1, it is the very best or finest.

Abide by a decision : If you abide by a decision, you accept it and comply with it, even though you might disagree with it.

About face : If someone changes their mind completely, this is an about face. It can be used when companies, governments, etc, change their position on an issue.

Above board :  If things are done above board, they are carried out in a legal and proper manner.

Achilles’ heel : A person’s weak spot is their Achilles’ heel.

Acid test : An acid test is something that proves whether something is good, effective, etc, or not.

Across the board  : If something applies to everybody, it applies across the board.

Against the Grain : If doing something goes against the grain, you’re unwilling to do it because it contradicts what you believe in, but you have no real choice.

Ahead of the pack : If you are ahead of the pack, you have made more progress than your rivals.

Albatross around your neck : An albatross around, or round, your neck is a problem resulting from something you did that stops you from being successful.

All and sundry :  This idiom is a way of emphasizing ‘all’, like saying ‘each and every one’.

All hell broke loose : When all hell breaks loose, there is chaos, confusion and trouble.

All over the place : If something is completely disorganized or confused, it is all over the place.

All over the shop : If something is completely disorganized or confused, it is all over the shop.

All skin and bone : If a person is very underweight, they are all skin and bone, or bones.

All talk and no trousers : Someone who is all talk and no trousers, talks about doing big, important things, but doesn’t take any action.

All the tea in China : If someone won’t do something for all the tea in China, they won’t do it no matter how much money they are offered.

Alter ego : An alter ego is a very close and intimate friend. It is a Latin phrase that literally means ‘other self’.

Ambulance chaser : A lawyer who encourages people who have been in accidents or become ill to sue for compensation is an ambulance chaser.

Amen : Some use ‘Amen’ or ‘Amen to that’ as a way of agreeing with something that has just been said.

An old flame : An old flame is a person that somebody has had an emotional, usually passionate, relationship with, who is still looked on fondly and with affection.

Ants in your pants : If someone has ants in their pants, they are agitated or excited about something and can’t
keep still.

Apple of your eye : Something or, more often, someone that is very special to you is the ‘apple of your’ eye.

Arm and a leg : If something costs an arm and a leg, it is very expensive.

As cold as ice : This idiom can be used to describe a person who does not show any emotion.

As cool as a cucumber : If someone is as cool as a cucumber, they don’t get worried by anything.

As mad as a hatter : This simile means that someone is crazy or behaves very strangely. In the past many people
who made hats went insane because they had a lot of contact with mercury.

As neat as a new pin : This idiom means tidy and clean.

As one man : If people do something as one man, then they do it at exactly the same time or in complete
agreement.

As the actress said to the bishop : This idiom is used to highlight a sexual reference, deliberate or accidental.

As the crow flies : This idiom is used to describe the shortest possible distance between two places.

At a loose end : If you are at a loose end, you have spare time but don’t know what to do with it.

At death’s door : If someone looks as if they are at death’s door, they look seriously unwell and might actually
be dying.

At loggerheads : If people are at loggerheads, they are arguing and can’t agree on anything.

At loose ends : If you are at a loose end, you have spare time but don’t know what to do with it.

At the coalface : If you work at the coalface, you deal with the real problems and issues, rather than sitting in a office discussing things in a detached way.

At the drop of a hat : If you would do something at the drop of a hat, you’d do it immediately.

At the end of your rope : If you are at the end of your rope, you are at the limit of your patience or endurance.

At the end of your tether : If you are at the end of your tether, you are at the limit of your patience or endurance.

Avowed intent : If someone makes a solemn or serious promise publicly to attempt to reach a certain goal,
this is their avowed intent.

Awe inspiring : Something or someone that is awe inspiring amazes people in a slightly frightening but
positive way.

AWOL : AWOL stands for Absent Without Leave, or Absent Without Official Leave. Originally a military term, it is used when someone has gone missing without telling anyone or asking for permission.

Axe to grind : If you have an axe to grind with someone or about something, you have a grievance, or
resentment and you want to get revenge or sort it out.

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